The Sculpture Collector

Posts Tagged ‘Sculpture Methodologies’

Living Sculptures : Art Innovation or Landscape Design?

In sculpture movements, Sculpture Techniques on March 11, 2011 at 6:04 am

We’ve all seen the recent green movement rise up in popularity over the past few years. It’s affected almost every industry including the arts to a great extent. One particular movement that we’d like to tackle today is the issue of “living sculpture”. I bet you’ve seen those large gardens often spotted amidst locations of royalty or government. These are the ones laden with sculpted trees and shrubs (a good example could be the garden maze that we always see on television and movies.) These are examples of living sculptures, or so people say. Landscape architects and designers argue that this movement is merely an extension of their own profession.

grasswoman sculpture of the land art movement

As far as we know, there are a few categories that belong to the movement of living sculpture, some that intercross with landscape design as well. First off, we have Topiary art. This is a more common sight and it engulfs the examples I gave earlier. Topiary art can usually be made by creating shapes or forms from living plants. Select pruning and contour restriction training are some of the techniques of this art. Bonsai is also a product of this discipline that portrays miniature trees as artworks in landscape. Creatively cutting crop areas also qualifies as the creation of living sculpture. Turf or sod-work on the other hand, is a more recent development that has stemmed out of the Land-Art movement of sculpture. They were seen as a way for art to be a direct part of nature and landscape, and were often temporary and large-scale.

Today, there are many that can differentiate living art from landscape design, and there are also those who believe that the two are one and the same. What do you classify as living art?

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Peter Reginato

In Sculpture Personalities, Sculpture Techniques on March 1, 2011 at 1:36 am

Abstract sculptor Peter Reginato is famous for putting the randomness of abstract expressionism into his many multi-dimension works. He began his journey into abstract sculpture in the 1960’s and moved to New York from his stay at the San Fransisco Art Institute. His devotion and time spent with the craft landed him the opportunity to be invited to several group shows in prestigous places like the Park Place Gallery in NY. Later on in his career, Reginato was represented by the Tibor de Nagy Gallery.

Artwork Sculpture by Peter Reginato

Little Mo Sculpture by Peter Reginato, Photography by the artist (2006)

His bold sculptures deeply resemble the paintings of abstraction that spread out in a burst of contours and color. For one to create a 3D version of that effect is a task that Reginato had spent several years to perfect. Reginato’s works contained shaped elements ranging from spirals to springs and blobs to figures. His diversity in composition was utterly astounding with every individual work.

Reginato had a two man partner show entitled “Color-Coded” with Ronnie Landfield in 2005 at the Heidi Cho Gallery in Chelsea. In 2007 though he had is own one-man show at the same gallery. The sculpture exhibition was comprised of his welded stainless steel sculptures and was entitled “Low Maintenance” maybe because these works were unpainted and left bare in their natural metallic state. Reginato’s passion for the steel collages is a deeply admirable one. His hobby turned into his career and he is one of the lucky people in the world that loves what he does.

Clement Meadmore, A Pioneer of Steel Abstractions

In Sculpture Personalities, Sculpture Techniques on March 1, 2011 at 1:04 am

Hailing from Melbourne, Australia, Meadmore was a someone who came into sculpture from a designer’s background. He had studied aeronautical engineering and industrial design at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, after which he tried his hand at creating furniture designs for over five years before creating hi first welded sculpture in the late 1950’s. Meadmore exhibited mainly around his local area and Sydney during around the same period of time. He moved to New York though some years after he had started exhibiting his sculptures.

Steel Sculpture

Curl, 1968 By Clement Meadmore

He specialized in steel structures that were larger than your average decorative art sculptures, but was able to maintain a sense of fluidity and aesthetic sensibility in most of his creations. He used steel, aluminum and bronze to fashion large outdoor pieces of minimalism and abstract expressionism. Many 0f his works revolved around the theme of music, particularly jazz since he was also an avid amateur drummer and jazz fan. Aside from his sculptures being collected privately and publicly, Meadmore was also the author of popular design books How to Make Furniture Without Tools and The Modern Chair: Classic Designs by Thonet, Breuer, Le Corbusier, Eames and Others. The designer part of him still yearned for industrial creation all through his artistic years in the business.

Meadmore’s unique style can be observed in many public locations such as the Newport Harbor Museum in Newport Beach, Figge Art Museum in Davenport, Johnson County Community College in Overland Park, and many others places.

Sand Sculpting Festivals Around the Globe

In Art Hotspots, Sculpture Techniques on March 1, 2011 at 12:21 am

Around the world, sand festivals are growing in popularity. Sometimes called Sand Sculpture Festivals because of the main attraction involved, thousands of people gather to witness both the making of monumentally scaled sand artwork, and the exhibit of diverse compositions one would never see at a regular gallery. These festivals showcase the talent and flexibility of sculptors while testing their mastery. Working with sand as a medium is often difficult because of its grainy tendency to crumble down. During the Sand Sculpting Australia “Dinostory” Festival, sculptors were excited to sculpt their favorite prehistoric subjects out of raw beach sand. The Australian Festival is a yearly event that is held at Frankston, Victoria since 2008.

sand artwork from australia

Sand Sculpture – Photography by John O’ Neill

Other countries that encourage this type of sculptural activity include Canada (Lau Beauchamp Park and Clam Harbor in Nova Scotia), Germany (Berlin’s Sandsation Festival) and India (Goa Sand Festival) among others. Many subjects that are sculpted in sand are drawn directly from themes given during the competition, however some artits, like Patnaik in India, prefer to sculpt artwork in support for a specific cause like the tsunami strike in Puri.

The most widespread sand sculpting festival in Portugal; the International Sand Sculpture Festival was the largest of its kind anywhere in the world. It has been held in Algarve since 2003. Russia also contributes to the worldwide phenomena of sand sculpting, with its recent 2005 sand show; “Animal World” which was held at the Moscow Zoo. To much of everybody’s surprise, the venue and inspirational surroundings gave the artists exactly what they needed to put up one heck of a show. Sand sculpting around the world has been the recent dream of many artists and even some regular beach-hoppers. It’s a fun and recreational practice that encourages creativity in today’s fast-paced society.

Louise Bourgeois : Founder of Confessional Art

In Sculpture Personalities, Sculpture Techniques on February 26, 2011 at 7:29 am

A French American Sculptor, Louise was also nicknamed the “Spiderwoman” for her spider-like sculptures that she entitled Manman. Louise’s are focuses mainly on the themes of humsn expression, i.e. loneliness, anxiety, betrayal. She considered her abstract works to be narratives of emotion and wanted them to convey some sort of human condition that language alone could not fully communicate.

The Manman Sculpture of Louise Bourgeoise

Despite her introvert-personality as a child and her hatred for her father, She managed to gain strength as an artist and studied t several prestigious schools to hone her craft. Such schools included the Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris and the École des Beaux-Arts. Learning from many great masters in the world of sculpture, she slowly developed her very own mannerism and techniques. She also eventually taught art at the Pratt Institute and the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture.

Her Sculpture, Manman is one of the famous spider structures she had set up. She began to create these tall, spiny-legged abstractions in the late 1990’s and incorporated the spider subject as a core element in her work. Manman stands to be over nine meters tall and is made up of steel and marble. Eventually more were made, but not using the same material. Louise mentioned that the spider, being a clever weaver, was an ode to her late mother who was in charge of their tapestry business. It also reminded her about how her mother used to protect them from harmful externals, the way spiders eat pest insects.

 

Cast Sculpture and Carved Sculpture: The Difference

In Sculpture Techniques on February 26, 2011 at 7:02 am

What makes casting sculpture different from carving it? Well, first off the two make use of entirely different processes. Casting involves more of a chemical knowledge base, while carving requires a knowledge about tools and practical usage. For this article let us take a look at the opposing aspects, advantages and disadvantages of using these two methodologies.

Cast sculpture usually involves a series of liquid and powdered ingredients as well as a negative mould. The process is more complicated in theory, but much simpler in real-time. Casting resin usually starts from an original design, whether made in clay or copied from an existing model, a design must be able to be durable enough to withstand the moulding process. For resin casting, either plaster or silicone is pasted onto the model to replicate a negative side of it quite accurately. The mould is then set to dry for later. Before the casting, resin powder and other ingredients must be measured. Release wax must also be applied to the mould ends. Then a mixture of the casting investment is then poured into the mould and set to dry. When it has dried, the mould is either separated or chipped away to reveal the sculpture inside. Furnishing, painting and buffing then follow to finally complete the sculpture.

Carving sculpture on the other hand is much more simpler in theory but tedious in real-time. A sculptor usually makes use of a set of power tools, a water jet, and a hammer and chisel set. The process basically entails chipping away at a hard natural material such as alabaster, nephrite, or metamorphic rocks with beautiful raw color and patterns. The finished sculpture is then cleaned and buffed to bring out its natural tones.

Carved sculpture has natural colors while cast sculpture makes use of industrial paints, however cast sculpture can maintain a variety of curvaceous or liquid forms that would be hard to recreate in carved stone. Another aspect of comparison could be durability. Some people say that carved sculptures hold the natural durability of their stones while the lasting strength of cast sculpture depends mainly on the composition of the materials mixed into the investment. Cast sculpture also makes it easier for artists to create sculptural designs with better ease.

All in all there are many trade-offs to choosing either methodology, but both have their own uniqueness in the world of fine sculpture.