The Sculpture Collector

Posts Tagged ‘Steel Sculpture’

Peter Reginato

In Sculpture Personalities, Sculpture Techniques on March 1, 2011 at 1:36 am

Abstract sculptor Peter Reginato is famous for putting the randomness of abstract expressionism into his many multi-dimension works. He began his journey into abstract sculpture in the 1960’s and moved to New York from his stay at the San Fransisco Art Institute. His devotion and time spent with the craft landed him the opportunity to be invited to several group shows in prestigous places like the Park Place Gallery in NY. Later on in his career, Reginato was represented by the Tibor de Nagy Gallery.

Artwork Sculpture by Peter Reginato

Little Mo Sculpture by Peter Reginato, Photography by the artist (2006)

His bold sculptures deeply resemble the paintings of abstraction that spread out in a burst of contours and color. For one to create a 3D version of that effect is a task that Reginato had spent several years to perfect. Reginato’s works contained shaped elements ranging from spirals to springs and blobs to figures. His diversity in composition was utterly astounding with every individual work.

Reginato had a two man partner show entitled “Color-Coded” with Ronnie Landfield in 2005 at the Heidi Cho Gallery in Chelsea. In 2007 though he had is own one-man show at the same gallery. The sculpture exhibition was comprised of his welded stainless steel sculptures and was entitled “Low Maintenance” maybe because these works were unpainted and left bare in their natural metallic state. Reginato’s passion for the steel collages is a deeply admirable one. His hobby turned into his career and he is one of the lucky people in the world that loves what he does.

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The Cubi Sculpture Series by David Smith

In Sculpture Personalities, Sculpture Techniques on March 1, 2011 at 1:19 am

American sculptor David Smith created over 28 fascinating stainless steel sculptures entitled “Cubi”. These pieces, though part of a whole series, are all originally insightful on their own. Seemingly derived from cubism in painting, these notable rigid artworks are a feat of balance, proportion and artistic mastery. Unfortunately, Smith died from a car accident in 1965 after completing the 28th sculpture, there may have been more that he intended to create.

David Smith SculptureCubi VI, sculpture by David Smith (1963)

The 28th work, Cubi XXVIII was finished that year as well (1965) and was the most expensive artwork ever sold in the category of contemporary art at Sotheby’s New York auction house. The piece sold for 23.8 million dollars to billionaire art collector Eli Broad.

Cubi was an intuitive series that deeply extended the mastery of steel sculpture that Smith had already obtained during his many years at the practice. Some of his other Cubi sculptures made their way into internationally acclaimed museums as well, like Cubi VII went to the Art Institute of Chicago, and another work went to the Hirshhorm Museum. The legacy left behind by Smith casts a shadow on all other steel welding sculptors if they should hope to accomplish the greatness that he has through his monumental pieces.

Clement Meadmore, A Pioneer of Steel Abstractions

In Sculpture Personalities, Sculpture Techniques on March 1, 2011 at 1:04 am

Hailing from Melbourne, Australia, Meadmore was a someone who came into sculpture from a designer’s background. He had studied aeronautical engineering and industrial design at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, after which he tried his hand at creating furniture designs for over five years before creating hi first welded sculpture in the late 1950’s. Meadmore exhibited mainly around his local area and Sydney during around the same period of time. He moved to New York though some years after he had started exhibiting his sculptures.

Steel Sculpture

Curl, 1968 By Clement Meadmore

He specialized in steel structures that were larger than your average decorative art sculptures, but was able to maintain a sense of fluidity and aesthetic sensibility in most of his creations. He used steel, aluminum and bronze to fashion large outdoor pieces of minimalism and abstract expressionism. Many 0f his works revolved around the theme of music, particularly jazz since he was also an avid amateur drummer and jazz fan. Aside from his sculptures being collected privately and publicly, Meadmore was also the author of popular design books How to Make Furniture Without Tools and The Modern Chair: Classic Designs by Thonet, Breuer, Le Corbusier, Eames and Others. The designer part of him still yearned for industrial creation all through his artistic years in the business.

Meadmore’s unique style can be observed in many public locations such as the Newport Harbor Museum in Newport Beach, Figge Art Museum in Davenport, Johnson County Community College in Overland Park, and many others places.